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Booker T. Washington 2 Inch Round Magnet

$4.10

$4.10 per magnet

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Shape
Round Magnet
Size
Standard, 2¼ Inch
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About this product
Shape: Round Magnet

Your refrigerator called and said it was feeling mighty lonely. Why not give it a few friends to play with by creating a couple of custom magnets! Add your favorite image to a round magnet, or shop the thousands of options for a cool square magnet.

  • Available in 3 sizes from 1.25" to 3" diameter
  • Printed on 100% recycled paper
  • Covered with scratch and UV-resistant mylar
  • Available in square shape also
About this design
available on or 24 products
Booker T. Washington 2 Inch Round Magnet
Booker Taliaferro Washington (April 5, 1856 – November 14, 1915) was an American educator, author, orator and political leader. He was the dominant figure in the African American community in the United States from 1890 to 1915. He was representative of the last generation of black leaders born in slavery and spoke on behalf of blacks living in the South. Washington was able throughout the final 25 years of his life to maintain his standing as the major black leader because of the sponsorship by powerful whites, substantial support within the black community, his ability to raise educational funds from both groups and his accommodation to the social realities of the age of Jim Crow segregation.[1] Washington was born into slavery to a white father and a slave mother in a rural area in southwestern Virginia. After emancipation, he worked in West Virginia in a variety of manual labor jobs before making his way to Hampton Roads seeking an education. He worked his way through Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute (now Hampton University) and attended college at Wayland Seminary (now Virginia Union University). After returning to Hampton as a teacher, in 1881 he was named as the first leader of the new Tuskegee Institute in Alabama.
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