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egypt king tut red sweatshirt
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About this product
<p>Brave any outdoor activity in the comfort of this classic crewneck sweatshirt.  It’s both plush and durable in its construction – a true staple for any wardrobe that will last.  Select a design from our marketplace or customize it to make it your own!</p>
<p>Size & Fit</p>
<ul>
<li> Model is 6’0” and wearing a medium</li>
<li> Standard fit</li>
<li> Fits true to size</li></ul>
<p>Fabric & Care</p>
<ul>
<li> 10oz. cotton-poly blend with a 100% cotton face</li>
<li> Set-in sleeves and double-needle stitched neckline, armholes and bottom band for long-term durability</li>
<li> Imported</li>
<li> Machine wash cold. Tumble dry low. </li>
</ul>
Style: Men's Basic Sweatshirt

Brave any outdoor activity in the comfort of this classic crewneck sweatshirt. It’s both plush and durable in its construction – a true staple for any wardrobe that will last. Select a design from our marketplace or customize it to make it your own!

Size & Fit

  • Model is 6’0” and wearing a medium
  • Standard fit
  • Fits true to size

Fabric & Care

  • 10oz. cotton-poly blend with a 100% cotton face
  • Set-in sleeves and double-needle stitched neckline, armholes and bottom band for long-term durability
  • Imported
  • Machine wash cold. Tumble dry low.
About this design
see on 119 styles
egypt king tut red sweatshirt
Nebkheperure Tutankhamun (alternately spelled with Tuten-, -amen, -amon; lack of written vowels in Egyptian allows for different transliterations) *tuwt-?ankh-yaman was a Pharaoh of the Eighteenth dynasty (ruled 1333 BC – 1324 BC), during the period of Egyptian history known as the New Kingdom. His original name, Tutankhaten, meant "Living Image of Aten", while Tutankhamun meant "Living Image of Amun". He is possibly also the Nibhurrereya of the Amarna letters. --------------------------------------------- In historical terms, Tutankhamun is of only moderate significance, and most of his modern popularity stems from the fact that his tomb in the Valley of the Kings was discovered almost completely intact. However, he is also significant as a figure who managed the beginning of the transition from the heretical Atenism of his predecessors Akhenaten and Smenkhkare back to the familiar Egyptian religion. As Tutankhamun began his reign at age 9, his vizier and eventual successor Ay was probably making most of the important political decisions during Tutankhamun's reign. Nonetheless, Tutankhamun is, in modern times, the one of the most famous of the Pharaohs, and the only one to have a nickname in popular culture ("King Tut"). The 1923 discovery by Howard Carter of Tutankhamun's nearly intact tomb (subsequently designated KV62) received worldwide press coverage and sparked a renewed public interest in ancient Egypt, of which Tutankhamun remains the popular face. -------------------------------------------------------- Tutankhamun's parentage is uncertain. An inscription calls him a king's son, but it is not clear which king was meant. Most scholars think that he was probably a son either of Amenhotep III (though probably not by his Great Royal Wife Tiye), or more likely a son of Amenhotep III's son Akhenaten around 1342 BC. However, Professor James Allen argues that Tutankhamun was more likely to be a son of the short-lived king Smenkhkare rather than Akhenaten. Allen argues that Akhenaten consciously chose a female co-regent named Neferneferuaten to succeed him rather than Tutankhamun which is unlikely if the latter was indeed his son. Tutankhamun was married to Ankhesenpaaten (possibly his sister), and after the re-establishment of the traditional Egyptian religion the couple changed the –aten ending of their names to the –amun ending, becoming Ankhesenamun and Tutankhamun. They had two known children, both stillborn girls – their mummies were discovered in his tomb.------------------------------------Tutankhamun's parentage over the years was once very confusing but now egyptologists have a pretty good idea on who his parents were. The first theory was that he was a son of Amenhotep III and Queen Tiye. This theory seems unlikely because Tiye living to year 14 of her son's reign would have been at least 64 years of age so that would mean that she would have been too old to produce any more offspring. Also Amenhotep III by this time would have been dead because the last year of his reign (38) was the last year of his life. Another theory is that Tutankhamun was the son of Smenkhkare and Meritaten. This theory is possible but not plausible. Smenkhkare came on the scene when Akhenaten entered the 14th year of his reign and during this time Meritaten married Smenkhkare. So if Smenkhkare is the father of Tutankhamun he would have needed a three year reign or more because if it was a three year reign Tutankhamun would have been barely seven when he came to the throne. The most current theory is that he was the son of Akhenaten and his minor wife Kiya. Queen Kiya's title was "Greatly Beloved Wife of Akhenaten" so it is quite likely she could have borne him an heir. Also in the tomb of Akhenaten images on the tomb wall show that next to Kiya's death bed there stands a royal fan bearer fanning what is either a princess or most likely a wet nurse holding a baby. So that means that the wet nurse was holding the boy-king-to-be.-----------------During Tutankhamun's reign, Akhenaten's Amarna revolution (Atenism) began to be reversed. Akhenaten had attempted to supplant the existing priesthood and gods with a god who was until then considered minor, Aten. In Year 3 of Tutankhamun's reign (1331 BC), when he was still a boy of about 11 and probably under the influence of two older advisors (notably Akhenaten's vizier Ay), the ban on the old pantheon of gods and their temples was lifted, the traditional privileges restored to their priesthoods, and the capital moved back to Thebes. The young pharaoh also adopted the name Tutankhamun, changing it from his birth name Tutankhaten. Because of his age at the time these decisions were made, it is generally thought that most if not all the responsibility for them falls on his vizier Ay and perhaps other advisors. Also, King Tutankhamun restored all the old gods and brought order to the chaos that his relative had caused. He built many temples devoted to the true sun god, Amun-Ra. It appears that on Tutankhamun's wooden box (pictured above) depicts him going to war against Hittites and Nubians suggesting that possibly that in the last few years of his reign that he went to war that possibly that he died going to war.----------------------------------A now-famous letter to the Hittite king Suppiluliumas I from a widowed queen of Egypt, explaining her problems and asking for one of his sons as a husband, has been attributed to Ankhesenamun (among others). Suspicious of this good fortune, Suppiluliumas I first sent a messenger to make inquiries on the truth of the young queen's story. After reporting her plight back to Suppiluliumas I, he sent his son, Zannanza, accepting her offer. However, he got no further than the border before he died, perhaps murdered. If Ankhesenamun were the queen in question, and his death a murder, it was probably at the orders of Horemheb or Ay, who both had the opportunity and the motive to kill him.
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egypt king tut red sweatshirt

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Artwork designed by planetearth. Made by Zazzle Apparel in San Jose, CA. Sold by Zazzle.
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Product ID: 235384794449211594
Made on: 12/16/2006 12:21 PM
Reference: Guide Files