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  • T-Shirt: Front
  • T-Shirt: Back
  • T-Shirt: Front Full
    Front Full
  • T-Shirt: Back Full
    Back Full
  • T-Shirt: Design Front
    Design Front
  • T-Shirt: Design Back
    Design Back
  • T-Shirt: Detail - Neck (in White)
    Detail - Neck (in White)
  • T-Shirt: Detail - Hem (in White)
    Detail - Hem (in White)
About this product
Style: Value T-Shirt

This classic silhouette is an affordable alternative heavyweight t-shirt for the value-conscious consumer. Rest assured as this t-shirt is pre-shrunk and made from 100% cotton. It also has double-needle stitched bottom and hems for extra durability. Select a design from our marketplace or customize it and unleash your creativity!

Size & Fit

  • Model is 6’0” and is wearing a medium
  • Standard fit
  • Fits true to size

Fabric & Care

  • 5.4 oz. 100% cotton
  • 1x1 rib knit collar and shoulder-to-shoulder taping
  • Double-needle hem
  • Imported
  • Machine wash cold
About this design
John Tyler (March 29, 1790 – January 18, 1862) was the tenth (1841-1845) President of the United States. A long-time Democrat, he was elected Vice President on the Whig ticket and on becoming president, in 1841, he broke with that party. His most famous achievement was the annexation of the Republic of Texas in 1845. He was the first president born after the adoption of the U.S. Constitution and the first to assume the office of President upon the death of his predecessor, William Henry Harrison. His presidency rarely taken seriously in his time, he was usually referred to as the "Acting President" or "His Accidency" by opponents. Further, Tyler quickly found himself at odds with his former political supporters. Harrison had been expected to adhere closely to Whig Party policies and work closely with Whig leaders, particularly Henry Clay. Tyler shocked Congressional Whigs by vetoing virtually the entire Whig agenda, twice vetoing Clay's legislation for a national banking act following the Panic of 1837 and leaving the government deadlocked. Tyler was officially expelled from the Whig Party in 1841, a few months after taking office, and became known as "the man without a party." The entire cabinet he had inherited from Harrison resigned in September, aside from Daniel Webster, Secretary of State, who remained to finalize the Webster-Ashburton Treaty in 1842, demonstrating his independence from Clay. For two years, Tyler struggled with the Whigs, but when he nominated John C. Calhoun as Secretary of State, to 'reform' the Democrats, the gravitational swing of the Whigs to identify with "the North" and the Democrats as the party of "the South," led the way to the sectional party politics of the next decade. The last year of Tyler's presidency was marred by a freak accident that killed two of his Cabinet members. During a ceremonial cruise down the Potomac River on February 28, 1844, the main gun of the USS Princeton blew up during a demonstration firing, instantly killing Thomas Gilmer, the Secretary of the Navy, and Abel P. Upshur, the Secretary of State. Tyler met his second wife, Julia Gardiner, during the ceremony. Her father was also killed during the explosion. Tyler and Gardiner were married not long afterwards in New York City, on June 26, 1844. Tyler advocated annexation of Texas to the Union. Whigs opposed this expansion because it would upset the balance between North and South and risked war with Mexico. When the Senate blocked a treaty (which needed a 2/3 vote), Tyler annexed Texas through a joint resolution that passed the House 132-76 and the Senate 27-25 in the last days of his term. Tyler retired to a plantation, named "Walnut Grove", he had bought in Virginia, renaming it "Sherwood Forest" to signify that he had been "outlawed" by the Whig party and withdrew from electoral politics though his advice continued to be sought by states-rights Democrats. Tyler had long been an advocate of states' rights, believing that the question of a state's "free" or "slave" status ought to be decided at the state level, with no input from the federal government. He was a slaveholder his entire life. In February 1861, Tyler re-entered public life to sponsor and chair the Washington Peace Convention. The convention sought a compromise to avoid civil war while the Confederate Constitution was being drawn up at the Montgomery Convention. When the Senate rejected his plan, Tyler urged Virginia's immediate secession. Having served in the provisional Confederate Congress in 1861, he was elected to the Confederate House of Representatives but died of bronchitis and bilious fever before he could take office. His final words were "Perhaps it is best." Tyler is buried in Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond, Virginia. The city of Tyler, Texas is named for him.
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Other Info

Product ID: 235742698750678532
Created on: 5/7/2009 11:37 AM
Reference: Guide Files
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