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Lucky Temari Kai Retro Japanese Obi Kimono Pattern Wallets
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Lucky Temari Kai Retro Japanese Obi Kimono Pattern Wallets
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About this product
Large Leather Wallet

Ready for customization with your photos or designs, this large leather wallet is a stylish addition to any purse or handbag. It holds everything from credit cards to check books - perfect for the gal that wants to look fabulous and organized.

  • Customize the wallet cover with your photos, designs, and text.
  • Genuine leather exterior with magnetic snap closures.
  • Bill pocket, snap closure receipt pocket, zipper coin purse, nine credit card pockets, and checkbook cover/pocket.
  • Measurements: 3.75” x 7.25".
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About this design
Lucky Temari Kai Retro Japanese Obi Kimono Pattern
Temari balls are an folk art form that originated in China and were introduced to Japan five or six hundred years ago. The balls were originally made by mothers and grandmothers for the children to play with (they were used in kickball and handball games similar to the hackeysack games played around the world today). Historically they were constructed from the remnants of old kimonos. Pieces of silk fabric would be wadded up to form a ball, then the wad wrapped with strips of fabric. The silk threads would have been removed and saved and, used to first wind around the ball, then to stitch the ball firmly together (it is said that the balls were wrapped and stitched so tightly that they actually did bounce). As time moved on traditional Temari balls became an art, with the functional stitching more and more decorative and detailed, until the balls displayed very intricate embroidery. The balls transcended from play toys into art objects (although loving moms will still make them for their children) with the introduction of rubber to Japan. Temari balls became an art and craft of the Japanese upper class and aristocracy and noble women competed in creating more and more beautiful and intricate objects. They now represent a highly valued and cherished gift symbolizing deep friendship and loyalty. It is traditional for a mother to make a ball for her daughter as a New Year's gift. They are also defined as Hime-temari (silk balls), made to bring good fortune to the person who keeps them, and are made by hand wrapping silk threads of different colors. These crafts, filled with both the craftsman's gentle spirit and techniques, are believed to bestow happiness. The brilliant color and threads used also are symbolic of wishing the recipient a brilliant (happy) life. Traditionally becoming a craftsman in Japan was a tedious process (click here to learn more). To become a Temari artist in Japan today requires specific training and one must be tested on one's skills and technique before being acknowledged as a crafter of Temari. (Click here for more detailed history and info about certification from the Japan Temari Association.) The patterns are geometric and usually symmetrical, with many of the design elements being based upon nature. In appearance, most are very reminiscent of a kaleidoscope's patterns. Modern day creations may use a preformed ball base (the "mari") - generally a styrofoam ball or large wooden bead - which is then wrapped with a layer of yarn and then a layer of regular weight sewing thread (it requires at least three hundred yards for a three inch ball) - both of which must be placed smoothly to insure roundness of the ball. Strict traditional Temari artists will still create their own mari base from discarded fabric or other materials that can be wadded into the shape of a sphere. Sometimes a layer of batting is applied prior to the yarn wrap in order to smooth and round the ball form. The ball is then divided with relational geometry using a thin paper strip - no defined measuring is generally used. The divisions are indicated with pins and then marking threads are placed. If the marking threads are incorporated into the design they will often be done in gold or silver - other designs require the marking threads to be the same color as the base thread wrap so as to blend into the background. (For more information click here ). After the ball is prepared and marked the designs are embroidered with a variety of threads. The most common type used today is pearl cotton, although finer and specialty silk, metallic and rayon embroidery threads or embroidery ribbons assist in producing even more beautiful outcomes. The designs are accomplished by either stitching the patterns (there are very few basic, simple stitches) or by designated wrapping. A combination of the two may also be used. There are no defined outcomes - Temaris are limited only by the imagination of the crafter. It was traditional for the balls made for children as toys to have some rice in their center so as to have them rattle. Modern balls may have a jingle bell or rattle in their centers for good luck. Some balls, after they had been taken in as art, were further decorated with elaborate tassels made by intricate methods of braiding and knotting. Most Temari balls average three to five inches in diameter, although any size is possible and larger ones are popular in Japan, where collections of all sizes and styles are treasured. Smaller ones may be made for Christmas tree ornaments, and other home and personal accessories including jewelry. They may be displayed singly or collected and arranged in groups. When shown singly they may be hung in windows or from ceilings or doorjambs. They may be mounted from crossbars as a mobile. Single balls may be hung on tabletop display stands. Alternately they may be grouped in a bowl or basket, or shown individually on a ring base or "egg" stand. Temari balls make exquisite Christmas ornaments. They make wonderful, unique gifts and treasured as wedding and anniversary gifts, and as mementos of friendship and special occasions.
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Artwork designed by
AsianOrientation Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

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Lucky Temari Kai Retro Japanese Obi Kimono Pattern Wallets

$58.95 per wallet
Artwork designed by AsianOrientation. Made by Photo USA in Fremont, CA. Sold by Zazzle.
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Product ID: 256074024227959859
Made on: 9/9/2013 3:46 PM
Reference: Guide Files