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Solar Flare from the Star EV Lacertae EV Lac Poster

$72.65

per poster

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1
poster
50% off with code ZVALENTINE17
  • Front
    Front
  • Corner
    Corner
Designed for youby Astronomical
Extra Large (59.00" x 40.00")
More (22)
Value Poster Paper (Matte)
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About this product
Paper Type: Value Poster Paper (Matte)

Your walls are a reflection of your personality. So let them speak with your favorite quotes, art, or designs printed on our posters! Choose from up to 5 unique paper types and several sizes to create art that’s a perfect representation of you.

  • 45 lb., 7.5 point thick poster paper
  • Matte finish with a smooth surface
  • Economical option that delivers sharp, clean images with stunning color and vibrancy
  • More paper types available under "Paper Options"
  • Add a premium quality frame as an essential accessory
About this design
available on 106 products
Solar Flare from the Star EV Lacertae EV Lac Poster
For many years scientists have known that our sun gives off powerful explosions, known as flares, that contain millions of times more energy than atomic bombs. But when astronomers compare flares from the sun to flares on other stars, the sun's flares lose. On April 25, 2008, NASA's Swift satellite picked up a record-setting flare from a star known as EV Lacertae. This flare was thousands of times more powerful than the greatest observed solar flare. But because EV Lacertae is much farther from Earth than the sun, the flare did not appear as bright as a solar flare. Still, it was the brightest flare ever seen from a star other than the sun. What makes the flare particularly interesting is the star. EV Lacertae is much smaller and dimmer than our sun. In other words, a tiny, wimpy star is capable of packing a very powerful punch. How can such a small star produce such a powerful flare? The answer can be found in EV Lacertae's youth. Whereas our sun is a middle-aged star, EV Lacertae is a toddler. The star is much younger than our sun, and is still spinning rapidly. The fast spin, together with its churning interior, whips up gases to produce a magnetic field that is much more powerful than the sun's magnetic field. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Nasa_EV_Lacertae_250408.jpg
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