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Aboriginal Spirit-Australia gold Long Sleeve T-Shirt

$29.65

per shirt

Qty:
1
25% off with code MARCHMADNEZZ
  • Front
    Front
  • Back
    Back
  • Front Full
    Front Full
  • Back Full
    Back Full
Runs small, size up for a more comfortable fit.
Women's Bella+Canvas Long Sleeve T-Shirt
More (155)
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About This Product
Style: Women's Bella+Canvas Long Sleeve T-Shirt

A classic women's tee fits like a well-loved favorite, featuring a semi-relaxed fit, classic crew neck, long sleeves and superior combed and ring-spun jersey cotton that's the perfect canvas for your designs.

Size & Fit

  • Model is 5'10" and is wearing a small
  • Semi-relaxed fit
  • True to size
  • Double-needle stitched cap sleeves and bottom hem

Fabric & Care

  • 100% combed and ring-spun cotton, 30 single 4.2 oz.
  • Heather - 90% combed and ring-spun cotton 10% poly
  • Machine wash warm, inside out, with like colors
  • Only non-chlorine bleach, tumble dry low
  • Medium iron, do not iron decoration
  • Do not dry clean
  • Imported
About This Design
available on or 2 products
Aboriginal Spirit-Australia gold Long Sleeve T-Shirt
Indigenous Australians are descendants of the first human inhabitants of the Australian continent and its nearby islands. The term includes both the Torres Strait Islanders and the Aboriginal People, who together make up about 2.5% of Australia's population. The latter term is usually used to refer to those who live in mainland Australia, Tasmania, and some of the other adjacent islands. The Torres Strait Islanders are indigenous Australians who live in the Torres Strait Islands between Australia and New Guinea. Indigenous Australians are recognised to have arrived between 40,000 and 70,000 years ago, though the lower end of this range has wider acceptance. ***************************** The term Indigenous Australians encompasses many diverse communities and societies, and these are further divided into local communities with unique cultures. Fewer than 200 of the languages of these groups remain in use — all but 20 are highly endangered. It is estimated that prior to the arrival of British settlers the population of Indigenous Australians was up to 1 million.The distribution of people was similar to that of the current Australian population, with the majority living in the south east centered along the Murray River. *****************Although the culture and lifestyle of Aboriginal groups have much in common, Aboriginal society is not a single entity. The diverse Aboriginal communities have different modes of subsistence, cultural practices, languages, and technologies. However, these peoples also share a larger set of traits, and are otherwise seen as being broadly related. A collective identity as Indigenous Australians is recognised and exists along names from the indigenous languages which are commonly used to identify groups based on regional geography and other affiliations. These include: Koori (or Koorie) in New South Wales and Victoria; Murri in Queensland; Noongar in southern Western Australia; Yamatji in Central Western Australia; Wangkai in the Western Australian Goldfields; Nunga in southern South Australia; Anangu in northern South Australia, and neighbouring parts of Western Australia and Northern Territory; Yapa in western central Northern Territory; Yolngu in eastern Arnhem Land (NT) and Palawah (or Pallawah) in Tasmania.*************************These larger groups may be further subdivided; for example, Anangu (meaning a person from Australia's central desert region) recognises localised subdivisions such as Yankunytjatjara, Pitjantjatjara, Ngaanyatjara, Luritja and Antikirinya. The term "blacks" has often been applied to Indigenous Australians. This owes rather more to racial stereotyping than ethnology, as it categorises Indigenous Australians with the other black peoples of Asia and Africa, despite the relationships only being ones of very distant shared ancestry. In the 1970s, many Aboriginal activists, such as Gary Foley proudly embraced the term "black", and writer Kevin Gilbert's groundbreaking book from the time was entitled Living Black. In recent years young Indigenous Australians — particularly in urban areas — have increasingly adopted aspects of black American and Afro-Caribbean culture, creating what has been described as a form of "black trans-nationalism."
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