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Bronenosets Rodchenko 1926 Battleship Potemkin Tote Bag

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Bronenosets Rodchenko 1926 Battleship Potemkin Tote Bag
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Style: Budget Tote

Design your own tote bag to haul your belongings in style! Available in 5 sizes to fit all your lugging needs, these bags are made of 100% natural material and can be customized with your favorite pictures and text for the perfect gift or casual accessory. Versatile, trendy, and durable, this custom tote means you'll always look fashionable!

  • Dimensions: 15.75"l x 15.25"w
  • Material: 4.75 oz. 100% cotton
  • Cotton handles with stress point reinforced stitching
  • Choice of 5 handle colors
  • Machine washable
About This Design
Bronenosets Rodchenko 1926 Battleship Potemkin Tote Bag
Aleksander Mikhailovich Rodchenko (Russian: Алекса́ндр Миха́йлович Ро́дченко, 5 December [O.S. 23 November] 1891 – December 3, 1956) was a Russian artist, sculptor, photographer and graphic designer. He was one of the founders of constructivism and Russian design; he was married to the artist Varvara Stepanova. Rodchenko was one of the most versatile Constructivist and Productivist artists to emerge after the Russian Revolution. He worked as a painter and graphic designer before turning to photomontage and photography. His photography was socially engaged, formally innovative, and opposed to a painterly aesthetic. Concerned with the need for analytical-documentary photo series, he often shot his subjects from odd angles—usually high above or below—to shock the viewer and to postpone recognition. He wrote: "One has to take several different shots of a subject, from different points of view and in different situations, as if one examined it in the round rather than looked through the same key-hole again and again." sometimes rendered as The Battleship Potyomkin, is a 1925 silent film directed by Sergei Eisenstein and produced by Mosfilm. It presents a dramatised version of the mutiny that occurred in 1905 when the crew of the Russian battleship Potemkin rebelled against their officers of the Tsarist regime. The Battleship Potemkin has been called one of the most influential propaganda films of all time, and was named the greatest film of all time at the World's Fair at Brussels, Belgium, in 1958. The film is in the public domain in some parts of the world. The film is composed of five episodes: "Men and Maggots" (Люди и черви), in which the sailors protest at having to eat rotten meat; "Drama at the Harbour" (Драма на тендре), in which the sailors mutiny and their leader, Vakulinchuk, is killed; "A Dead Man Calls for Justice" (Мёртвый взывает) in which Vakulinchuk's body is mourned over by the people of Odessa; "The Odessa Staircase" (Одесская лестница), in which Tsarist soldiers massacre the Odessans; and "The Rendez-Vous with a Squadron" (Встреча с эскадрой), in which the squadron ends up joining the sailors' side. Eisenstein wrote the film as a revolutionary propaganda film, but also used it to test his theories of "montage". The revolutionary Soviet filmmakers of the Kuleshov school of filmmaking were experimenting with the effect of film editing on audiences, and Eisenstein attempted to edit the film in such a way as to produce the greatest emotional response, so that the viewer would feel sympathy for the rebellious sailors of the Battleship Potemkin and hatred for their cruel overlords. In the manner of most propaganda, the characterization is simple, so that the audience could clearly see with whom they should sympathize. Eisenstein's experiment was a mixed success; he "was disappointed when Potemkin failed to attract masses of viewers", but the film was also released in a number of international venues, where audiences responded more positively. In both the Soviet Union and overseas, the film shocked audiences, but not so much for its political statements as for its use of violence, which was considered graphic by the standards of the time.[citation needed] The film's potential to influence political thought through emotional response was noted by Nazi propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels, who called Potemkin "a marvellous film without equal in the cinema ... anyone who had no firm political conviction could become a Bolshevik after seeing the film." Aleksandr Antonov — Grigory Vakulinchuk - Bolshevik Sailor Vladimir Barsky — Commander Golikov Grigori Aleksandrov — Chief Officer Giliarovsky Ivan Bobrov — Young Sailor Flogged While Sleeping (as I. Bobrov) Mikhail Gomorov — Militant Sailor Aleksandr Levshin — Petty Officer N. Poltavseva — Woman With Pince-nez Konstantin Feldman — Student Agitator Beatrice Vitoldi - Woman with the baby carriage. The most celebrated scene in the film is the massacre of civilians on the Odessa Steps (also known as the Primorsky or Potemkin Stairs). In this scene, the Tsar's Cossacks in their white summer tunics march down a seemingly endless flight of steps in a rhythmic, machine-like fashion firing volleys into a crowd. The victims include a young boy and a mother who is pushing a baby in a baby carriage. As she falls to the ground, dying, she leans against the carriage, nudging it away; it rolls down the steps amidst the fleeing crowd.
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