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Sir Richard Blackmore Trucker Hat

$17.75

per hat

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1
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About this product
Style: Trucker Hat

Looking to cheer your team, promote your brand, or simply keep the sun out of your eyes? Our custom hats are the perfect way to meet all these needs and more. Customize the front with a logo, design, or text and create an essential accessory that you will never leave behind!

  • Adjustable from 17" to 24"
  • 100% polyester foam front
  • Wide area to feature your design
  • 100% nylon mesh back keeps you cool
  • Available in 11 color combinations
Recommended for ages 13+
About this design
available on 14 products
Sir Richard Blackmore Trucker Hat
Sir Richard Blackmore (22 January 1654 – 9 October 1729), English poet and physician, is remembered primarily as the object of satire and as an example of a dull poet. He was, however, a respected physician and religious writer. He was born at Corsham, in Wiltshire, the son of a wealthy attorney. He was educated at Westminster School very briefly, and he entered St Edmund Hall, Oxford in 1669. He received his Bachelor of Arts in 1674 and his MA in 1676. He was a tutor at the college for a time, but in 1682 he received his inheritance from his father. He used the money to travel. He went to France, Geneva, and various places in Italy. He stayed for a while in Padua and graduated in medicine at Padua. Blackmore returned to England via Germany and Holland, and then he set up as a physician. In 1685 he married Mary Adams, whose family connections aiding him in winning a place in the Royal College of Physicians in 1687. He had trouble with the College, being censured for taking leave without permission, and he strongly opposed the project for setting up a free dispensary for the poor in London. This opposition would be satirised by Sir Samuel Garth in The Dispensary in 1699.
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Other Info
Product ID: 148274370030415867
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