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Stellar Nursery R136 in the Tarantula Nebula Mug

$20.80

per mug

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1
 
  • Left
    Left
  • Front Left
    Front Left
  • Center
    Center
  • Front Right
    Front Right
  • Right
    Right
  • Handle
    Handle
  • With Donut
    With Donut
Stellar Nursery R136 in the Tarantula Nebula Mug
Designed for youby Highton Ridley
Combo Mug
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Red
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About This Product
  • Sold by
Style: Combo Mug

Funny, unique, pretty, or personal, it's your choice for the perfect coffee mug. The outside of the mug features a bright white base for your photo, logo, pattern, or saying, while the rim & handle are vividly glazed in rich color. Match or complement the color of your existing dinnerware set, or gift your friend a mug in his or her favorite color.

  • Available in 11-ounce or 15-ounce
  • Dimensions:
    • 11-ounce: 3.8” h x 3.2” diameter
    • 15-ounce:4.5” high x 3.4” diameter
  • Microwave and dishwasher safe
  • Strong, ceramic construction
  • Meets or exceeds FDA requirements for food and beverage safety
  • Printed on demand in San Jose, California
About This Design
Stellar Nursery R136 in the Tarantula Nebula Mug
Galaxies, Stars and Nebulae series Hundreds of brilliant blue stars wreathed by warm, glowing clouds in appear in this the most detailed view of the largest stellar nursery in our local galactic neighborhood. The massive, young stellar grouping, called R136, is only a few million years old and resides in the 30 Doradus (or Tarantula) Nebula, a turbulent star-birth region in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a satellite galaxy of our Milky Way. There is no known star-forming region in our galaxy as large or as prolific as 30 Doradus. Many of the diamond-like icy blue stars are among the most massive stars known. Several of them are over 100 times more massive than our Sun. These hefty stars are destined to pop off, like a string of firecrackers, as supernovas in a few million years. The image, taken in ultraviolet, visible, and red light by Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3, spans about 100 light-years. The movement of the LMC around the Milky Way may have triggered the massive cluster's formation in several ways. The gravitational tug of the Milky Way and the companion Small Magellanic Cloud may have compressed gas in the LMC. Also, the pressure resulting from the LMC plowing through the Milky Way's halo may have compressed gas in the satellite. The cluster is a rare, nearby example of the many super star clusters that formed in the distant, early universe, when star birth and galaxy interactions were more frequent. The LMC is located 170,000 light-years away and is a member of the Local Group of Galaxies, which also includes the Milky Way. The Hubble observations were taken Oct. 20-27, 2009. The blue color is light from the hottest, most massive stars; the green from the glow of oxygen; and the red from fluorescing hydrogen. image code: dorneblmc Image credit: Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3
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