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THE POMO SHIRT

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THE POMO SHIRT
Independent artist’s content may not match model depicted; RealView™ technology illustrates fit and usage only.
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Doggie Ribbed Tank Top
 
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Doggie Ringer T-Shirt
 
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Style: Doggie Ribbed Tank Top

Pamper your pup and be the envy of the dog park with this ribbed tank top. Made from combed ringspun baby rib cotton for comfort, it's the perfect style statement for your furry pet!

  • Material: 5.8 oz., 100% combed ringspun baby rib cotton (Heather is a 90/10 cotton-poly blend)
  • Double-needled ribbed binding on sleeves, neck and bottom for strength
  • Select one size up for long-haired dogs
  • Machine wash in cold water. Tumble dry low
  • Use non-chlorine bleach only. Do not dry clean
Size: L
L (24-45 lbs)
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THE POMO SHIRT
The Pomo people are a Native American people of Northern California. They live on the Pacific Coast in the Northern San Francisco Bay Area between Cleone and Duncan's Point, and inland to Clear Lake. A separate group, called the Northeast Pomo, also lived near Stonyford.The people called Pomo were originally linked by location, language, and other elements of culture. They were not socially or politically linked as a large unified "tribe." Instead, they lived in small groups ("bands"), linked by geography, lineage and marriage, and relied upon fishing, hunting and gathering for their food. The name Pomo is derived from a suffix -pomo or -poma, which was attached to the names of villages and local groups, the meaning of which is "at red earth hole," since their languages is one of many endangered languages. The Pomo spoke seven distinct Pomoan languages that are not mutually intelligible. There are still a few speakers of some of the Pomoan languages and efforts are being made by the Pomo people to preserve those languages and other elements of their culture.---------The Pomo people participated in Shamanism, one form this took was the Kuksu religion that was evident in Central and Northern California, which included elaborate acting and dancing ceremonies in traditional costume, an annual mourning ceremony, puberty rites of passage, shamanic intervention with the spirit world and an all-male society that met in subterranean dance rooms. The Pomo believed in a supernatural being the Kuksu or Guksu (depending on their dialect) who lived in the south and who came during ceremonies to heal their illnesses. Medicine men dressed up as Kuksu. Another later shamanistic movement that took place and lasted through 1900 was Messiah Cult, introduced to them by the Wintun that was practiced through 1900. This cult believed in prophets who had dreams, "waking visions" and revelations from "presiding spirits" and "virtually formed a priesthood". The prophets earned much respect and status among the people.-----According to linguists, the Pomo people come from the Hokan speaking people: The Sonoma region was a critical meeting point of coastal redwood forests and interior valleys with their mixed woodlands. Linguists think that about 7000 BC a Hokan speaking people migrated into the valley and mountain regions around Clear Lake, and their language evolved into "Proto-Pomo." About 4000 BC to 5000 BC the pro-Pomoans migrated into the Russian River Valley and north to present day Ukiah. Their language diverged into western, southern, central and northern Pomo. Another people possibly Yukian speakers lived first in the Russian River Valley and the Lake Sonoma Area but the Pomoans slowly took these places over.---------The lifestyles of Pomo people changed with the arrival of immigrating Spanish and European-americans into California. At first with the Spanish missionaries, some of the southern Pomo were moved to the Mission San Francisco, later the Mission Sonoma to work and live. In the Russian River Valley, a missionary baptized the Makahmo Pomo people, and many Pomo people fled the valley because of this. One such group fled to the Upper Dry Creek Area. The surveyors of the Lake Sonoma region believe this is why the villages became more centralized. They suggest the people retreated to this remote valley and attempted to band together and defend themselves here.------- In 1837 a very deadly epidemic of small pox that came from settlements at Fort Ross wiped out most native people in the Sonoma and Napa regions. In 1850 the Russian River Valley Area was settled by the 49'ers and "Lake Sonoma Valley" area was homesteaded out. Many of the Pomo were then taken to reservations so that the new Americans could homestead the former Pomo lands. Some Pomo took jobs as ranch laborers, others lived in refuge villages. One ghost town in the Lake Sonoma Valley excavations was identified as "Amacha" built for 100 people but hardly used. Natives of the region remember their grandfathers hid out from the oncoming immigrants in the mid-1850's at Amacha. However one day soldiers reputedly took all the people in the village to government lands and burned the village houses.-----The United States acknowledges many groups of native people of the United States as "federally recognized tribes," giving them a quasi-sovereign status similar to that of states. Many other groups are not recognized. The Pomo groups presently recognized by the United States are based in Sonoma, Lake, and Mendocino Counties and include, among others: * Sherwood Valley Band of Pomo Indians * Lytton Band of Pomo Indians * Cloverdale Band of Pomo Indians * Dry Creek Band of Pomo Indians * Guidiville Band of Pomo Indians * Manchester-Point Arena Band of Pomo Indians * Coyote Valley Band of Pomo Indians * Hopland Band of Pomo Indians * Big Valley Band of Pomo Indians * Kashia Band of Pomo Indians.-----The United States acknowledges many groups of native people of the United States as "federally recognized tribes," giving them a quasi-sovereign status similar to that of states. Many other groups are not recognized. The Pomo groups presently recognized by the United States are based in Sonoma, Lake, and Mendocino Counties and include, among others: * Sherwood Valley Band of Pomo Indians * Lytton Band of Pomo Indians * Cloverdale Band of Pomo Indians * Dry Creek Band of Pomo Indians * Guidiville Band of Pomo Indians * Manchester-Point Arena Band of Pomo Indians * Coyote Valley Band of Pomo Indians * Hopland Band of Pomo Indians * Big Valley Band of Pomo Indians * Kashia Band of Pomo Indians.----The United States acknowledges many groups of native people of the United States as "federally recognized tribes," giving them a quasi-sovereign status similar to that of states. Many other groups are not recognized. The Pomo groups presently recognized by the United States are based in Sonoma, Lake, and Mendocino Counties and include, among others: * Sherwood Valley Band of Pomo Indians * Lytton Band of Pomo Indians * Cloverdale Band of Pomo Indians * Dry Creek Band of Pomo Indians * Guidiville Band of Pomo Indians * Manchester-Point Arena Band of Pomo Indians * Coyote Valley Band of Pomo Indians * Hopland Band of Pomo Indians * Big Valley Band of Pomo Indians * Kashia Band of Pomo Indians
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TODAY ONLY: 50% Off Totes  |  Up to 50% Off Invitations, T-Shirts, Pillows  & More  |  20% Off Sitewide  |  Use Code: ZONEDAYDEAL2  |  Details
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Product ID: 155966785855328268
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