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Celtic Skull & Crossbones Mandala Poster (18x24")

$25.20

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  • Front
    Front
  • Corner
    Corner
18" x 24"
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Poster Paper (Semi-Gloss)
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About This Product
Paper Type: Poster Paper (Semi-Gloss)

Your walls are a reflection of your personality. So let them speak with your favorite quotes, art, or designs printed on our posters! Choose from up to 5 unique paper types and several sizes to create art that’s a perfect representation of you.

  • 53 lb., 7.9 point thick poster paper
  • Recommended for large-format posters
  • Semi-gloss finish
  • More paper types available under "Paper Options"
  • Add a premium quality frame as an essential accessory
About This Design
Celtic Skull & Crossbones Mandala Poster (18x24")
This is a large Celtic "Carpet Page" design, like the many full page, decorative pages in medieval illuminated manuscripts such as the Books of Kells, Lindisfarne, and Durrow; but of course the main motif is not a traditional Celtic one. It's an ornate emblem of piracy, like you'd find on a sort of pirate flag that, of course, you'd never actually find anywhere or anywhen. This print is a 300 dpi printed copy of my digital painting. It's 18 by 24 inches in size. In sober fact, none of the branches of the Celtic tree were famous for seafaring. The closest we'd come historically would be the Venetii tribe, on the coast of Gaul - what's still a Celtic territory today, though we now call it Brittany - and the Venetii probably almost always stayed in sight of land. Semihistorically, or maybe in the land of legend, there's also the Welsh prince Madoc and Ireland's Saint Brendan, who each embarked on an imram, or journey-adventure, to the far west. But on the other hand the Irish, at least, were no strangers to the Caribbean in buccaneer days, if only because Oliver Cromwell had sold so many of them into slavery there. So pardon me for mixing up my Pirates of the Caribbean and my Celtic Art. The fact is, I just really liked the idea.
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