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Chauvet Cave painting Poster

$9.85

per poster

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1
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  • Front
    Front
  • Corner
    Corner
Designed for youby History Of Art
Custom (9.43" x 4.03")
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Value Cardstock Paper (Matte)
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About This Product
Paper Type: Value Cardstock Paper (Matte)

Your walls are a reflection of your personality. So let them speak with your favorite quotes, art, or designs printed on our posters! Choose from up to 5 unique paper types and several sizes to create art that’s a perfect representation of you.

  • 110 lb., 12-point thick cardstock
  • Available for prints 11"x16" or smaller
  • Matte finish with a smooth surface
About This Design
Chauvet Cave painting Poster
The Chauvet-Pont-d'Arc Cave in the Ardèche department of southern France is a cave that contains some of the earliest known cave paintings, as well as other evidence of Upper Paleolithic life. It is located near the commune of Vallon-Pont-d'Arc on a limestone cliff above the former bed of the Ardèche River. Discovered on December 18, 1994, it is considered one of the most significant prehistoric art sites. The cave was first explored by a group of three speleologists: Eliette Brunel-Deschamps, Christian Hillaire, and Jean-Marie Chauvet, for whom it was named. Chauvet (1996) has a detailed account of the discovery. In addition to the paintings and other human evidence, they also discovered fossilized remains, prints, and markings from a variety of animals, some of which are now extinct. Further study by French archaeologist Jean Clottes has revealed much about the site. The dates have been a matter of dispute but a study published in 2012 supports placing the art in the Aurignacian period, approximately 30,000–32,000 BP.
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Other Info
Product ID: 228445932214950064
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